© 2019 / Mark Stibbe Books

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30 December 2017

For me, any mention of the French Revolution immediately conjures up visions of Madame What-have-you knitting as the heads roll at the guillotine. This historical adventure of a plot to assassinate the king of England to initiate a similar revolution in Britain could indeed be construed as the original British spy story.

 

The plot is stumbled upon by the newly appointed Vicar of Deal who crosses the Channel to find out the fate of his French parents in law. He must avoid the marauding Republican Army which scours the French countryside weeding out Loyalists who would have the return of the French Monarchy.

 

The authors conjure up a keen tense picture of the French Spymaster and his agents as they separate to search for the Vicar in France and also to mingle with the hoards of French Loyalists who have fled across to Britain for safety. It’s up to the Vicar to foil the plot if he can only get back to London in time.

 

The telling of the tale is just old fashioned enough to add the historical flavor without detracting from the flow. Readable, exciting and plausible, it is the first in a series featuring Thomas Pryce, vicar and secret agent, set in a time when the New World Order of banking control and the Illuminati emerges.

 

My thanks to Rhoda Hardie PR for this ARC for which I submit an honest review.

 

  • ISBN: 1910786756

  • Publisher: Malcolm Down Publishing (3 Nov. 2017)

 

Review by: bookpostmortem

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3 November 2017

An authoritative yet easy to read, absolute romp of a novel set during the turbulence of the French Revolution. This is the first adventure in ‘The Chronicles of Thomas Pryce’, a vicar who studied at Oxford and is trained in the use of the sword and pistol. On hearing that the safety of his wife’s family is compromised, Thomas makes his way to Paris to rescue them. Seamlessly weaving fact and fiction Mark Stibbe and G. P. Taylor have created a world of political intrigue, cunning spies, and perilous endeavours.

 

Historical figures such as William Pitt and Lady Hester Stanhope populate the pages ensuring the period wrapped itself around me, and set me firmly in place. The more I read, the more I wanted to read and I found myself fully immersed in the story. The Fate of Kings is an excellent start to what promises to be a thoroughly entertaining series, long may it reign! 

Review by: Liz Robinson at LoveReading